Light It Up Blue – Autism Fact – April 18, 2014

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Autism from an Autistic Point of View.

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Light It Up Blue – Autism Fact – April 17, 2014

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For many children, symptoms improve with treatment and with age. Children whose language skills regress early in life—before the age of 3—appear to have a higher than normal risk of developing epilepsy or seizure-like brain activity. During adolescence, some children with an ASD may become depressed or experience behavioral problems, and their treatment may need some modification as they transition to adulthood. [Many] people with an ASD usually continue to need services and supports as they get older, but many are able to work successfully and live independently or within a supportive environment.

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Light It Up Blue – Autism Fact – April 16, 2014

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Twin and family studies strongly suggest that some people have a genetic predisposition to autism. Identical twin studies show that if one twin is affected, there is up to a 90 percent chance the other twin will be affected. There are a number of studies in progress to determine the specific genetic factors associated with the development of ASD. In families with one child with ASD, the risk of having a second child with the disorder is approximately 5 percent, or one in 20. This is greater than the risk for the general population. Researchers are looking for clues about which genes contribute to this increased susceptibility. In some cases, parents and other relatives of a child with ASD show mild impairments in social and communicative skills or engage in repetitive behaviors. Evidence also suggests that some emotional disorders, such as bipolar disorder, occur more frequently than average in the families of people with ASD.

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Light It Up Blue – Autism Fact – April 15, 2014

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Scientists aren’t certain about what causes ASD, but it’s likely that both genetics and environment play a role. Researchers have identified a number of genes associated with the disorder. Studies of people with ASD have found irregularities in several regions of the brain. Other studies suggest that people with ASD have abnormal levels of serotonin or other neurotransmitters in the brain. These abnormalities suggest that ASD could result from the disruption of normal brain development early in fetal development caused by defects in genes that control brain growth and that regulate how brain cells communicate with each other, possibly due to the influence of environmental factors on gene function. While these findings are intriguing, they are preliminary and require further study. The theory that parental practices are responsible for ASD has long been disproved.

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Light It Up Blue – Autism Fact – April 14, 2014

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As early as infancy, a baby with ASD may be unresponsive to people or focus intently on one item to the exclusion of others for long periods of time.  A child with ASD may appear to develop normally and then withdraw and become indifferent to social engagement.

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Light It Up Blue – Autism Fact – April 11, 2014

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ASD varies widely in severity and symptoms and may go unrecognized, especially in mildly affected children or when it is masked by more debilitating handicaps.

 

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Parent Social Commercial

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We made a commercial for the Parent Social in Movie Making class.

We hope you enjoy.

Art Auction and Parent Social
Friday, May 9, 2014 at 7:00pm
Mystic Celt
Chicago, Illinois

Light It Up Blue – Autism Fact – April 10, 2014

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The term “spectrum” refers to the wide range of symptoms, skills, and levels of impairment or disability that children with ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder) can have. Some children are mildly impaired by their symptoms, while others are severely disabled. The latest edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) no longer includes Asperger’s syndrome; the characteristics of Asperger’s syndrome are included within the broader category of ASD.

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Light It Up Blue – Autism Fact – April 9, 2014

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Restricted, repetitive patterns of behavior, interests, or activities.

 

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Light It Up Blue – Autism Fact – April 8, 2014

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Persistent deficits in social communication and social interaction across multiple contexts.

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